< Back to Thought Leadership

Evaluating The Impact Of South Dakota V. Wayfair

In late June, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision that significantly changed the sales and use tax collection requirements for the vast majority of online retailers and out-of-state sellers. On June 21st, the court issued a decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair case ruling that a substantial economic presence is all that is required for sales tax nexus under the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution. If a company has sales tax nexus in a state, they are required to collect sales or use tax on sales to customers in that state if the state has a sales or use tax. Throughout this article, we will refer to “sales or use tax” because of how each individual state defines the tax being collected by the seller. There can be slight differences between collecting a sales tax or use tax depending on the state, but for the majority of states, there is no difference between a seller collecting a sales tax and a use tax.

Prior to the Wayfair decision, a substantial physical presence in a state was required to have sales tax nexus under the Commerce Clause. The physical presence standard was established with two United States Supreme Court cases, National Bellas Hess v. Department of Revenue of Illinois and Quill Corp. v. North Dakota. Under the physical presence standard, a seller had to have property, personnel, or some other physical connection with a state to be required to collect and remit sales tax.
The minimum threshold for substantial economic presence under the South Dakota statute are annual sales of $100,000 or 200 separate transactions.The Wayfair decision left a number of questions unanswered by remanding several issues to the South Dakota courts to rule. We do not anticipate the South Dakota court to address any issues that will impact the substantial economic presence standard established by the Supreme Court in its Wayfair decision. What appears to be clear is the Supreme Court believes the minimum thresholds in the South Dakota statutes for substantial economic nexus were sufficient to comply with the Commerce Clause. The minimum thresholds for substantial economic presence under the South Dakota statute are annual sales of $100,000 or 200 separate transactions. A number of states have a similar minimum threshold in their existing substantial economic presence statutes.

The current standard that states are moving to for sales and use tax is a substantial economic nexus standard based on safe harbor levels of sales or number of transactions.  South Dakota’s law, for example, limits imposition of a sales or use tax collection responsibility to those taxpayers selling into the state who have $100,000 of gross receipts attributable to customers located in the state or 200 total sales transactions into the state. Both the gross receipts and number of sales transaction standards are based on a rolling twelve-month period.

Forty-five states currently impose a sales tax and/or use tax. Currently, 23 of the 45 states have statutes with nexus created by substantial economic presence. Companies meeting or exceeding the substantial economic nexus threshold established by a state are required to collect sales tax or use tax.  Many of the 23 states have statutes that are similar to the South Dakota substantial economic nexus provisions that were upheld by the Supreme Court in their Wayfair decision. The effective date for substantial economic nexus statutes in the 23 states phase in at various dates over the next six months.  Four of the 23 states have very low economic nexus thresholds, but allow the online retailer to comply with onerous reporting responsibilities in lieu of registering and collecting sales tax. We expect that many of the states that do not have economic nexus statutes to pass legislation in the coming months. For example, the New Jersey legislature has recently passed an economic nexus statute that is awaiting the Governor’s signature.

Evaluating Impact on Your Business

In determining the impact of the Wayfair decision and the introduction of the substantial economic presence nexus standard for sales or use tax collections, are a number of steps that should be taken in evaluating the impact of the Wayfair decision on your company:

  • Determine states in which the company has a sales tax or use tax collection responsibility based on each states’ substantial economic presence thresholds.
  • Determine the states the company should begin collecting sales tax or use tax on its sales.  When collecting sales tax or use tax, the customer remits the tax to the selling company. The selling company then remits the tax to the appropriate state. If no tax is collected and the company is subsequently audited by a state, the remittance of sales tax or use tax to the state is the responsibility of the company and it can be very difficult to subsequently collect the tax from the customer.
  • Most states ask a series of questions when registering to do business or for sales tax. One of the questions is when the company began doing business in the state and the date of the first sale. The questions are often used to generate nexus questionnaires for sales tax or income tax.
    • In states for which sales tax or use tax has not been collected, based on the company having no physical presence in the state, review past practices to confirm there was no physical presence. This is especially important for companies selling their products in an online market-place (i.e. Amazon, etc.) where they do not control where their inventory is held.
    • Based on the analysis, determine any exposure that may exist for uncollected sales tax.
    • In states for which income tax returns have not been filed, based on the company having no taxable presence in the state, review past practices to confirm there was no income tax nexus. This is especially important for companies selling their products in an online market-place (i.e. Amazon, etc.) where they do not control where their inventory is held.
    • Based on the analysis, determine any exposure that may exist for income tax.
  • There are a number of software alternatives to assist with the collection and remittance of collected sales tax or use tax. Most software programs also provide for the preparation of the required state sales and use tax returns.

The world of sales and use tax has changed significantly with the Wayfair Supreme Court decision. Companies will need to evaluate their sales and use tax collection responsibilities and appropriate next steps. Please contact your local Blue & Co. tax representative to assist you in the analysis of the impact of the Wayfair decision on your business and the appropriate next steps.

 

Tax Reform Resource Center

Blue & Co.,LLC - Read more in our Hot Topic Archive! Click Here. Like what you read? Subscribe to our newsletter. Click Here.

 

Related Articles

Donor Gift Receipts – IRS Substantiation Requirements

Donor Gift Receipts: IRS Substantiation Requirements

With the end of the year approaching, many not-for-profits see an increase in giving. Therefore, we thought it would be helpful to provide a brief summary of donors’ documentation requirements for tax-deductible gifts and what not-for-profits can provide to donors to assist in fulfilling these requirements. The Internal Revenue Service has provided documentation requirements for […]

Learn More
Buying Qualifying Business Assets Before Year-End Could Reduce Your Tax Liability

Buying Qualifying Business Assets Before Year-End Could Reduce Your Tax Liability

There is still time to reduce your 2018 tax liability by purchasing qualifying business assets, but you need to act soon! The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has enhanced two depreciation-related breaks that are popular year-end tax planning tools for businesses. To take advantage of these tax-saving measures, you must purchase qualifying assets and […]

Learn More
Make 2019 NQDC Plan Deferral Elections Now

Make 2019 NQDC Plan Deferral Elections Now

Employers may offer executives or other key employees a nonqualified deferred compensation (NQDC) plan. NQDC plans pay employees in the future for services currently performed. The plans allow deferral of the income tax associated with the compensation. But to receive this attractive tax treatment, NQDC plans must meet many requirements. One is that employees must […]

Learn More